Scientists Are Still Worried About the Vaccines to Treat COVID-19

0
711
Vaccines to treat COVID-19

The world is now rushing to discover the vaccines to treat COVID-19, which is a new threat. Every day new cases are approaching. Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News conducted a survey and has shown that currently, there are 35 drug development programmes on China, Europe, and North America.

From the gigantic pharma companies such as Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline to smaller biotechs like Gilead Sciences and Moderna are in this race. However, scientists across the world still feel that it may take around 12 months to find the vaccines to treat COVID-19.

In China, the Gilead has already started to run some clinical trials. The trials have started after the research, which shows that remdesivir has an effective result in a case where Chinese and US patients were involved. Takeda, a global bio-pharmaceutical company, said that they have started to develop a plasma-derived therapy to treat this COVID-19. The hyperimmune globulins are plasma-derived therapies, which, in the past, have proven itself as an effective treatment in case of severe viral respiratory infections. It is being predicted that this one can be a better treatment option to treat COVID-19.

COVID-19 has already taken away more than 3,000 lives worldwide. But, recently, scientists have found that camostat mesylate can be effective in fighting COVID-19. This drug is mainly used to treat pancreatic inflammation and is approved in Japan. The main author of the study, Markus Hoffman, has said that after isolating SARS-CoV-2 from an infected patient, they found camostat mesilate as an efficient drug that can block the virus from entering into the lung.

The US National Institute of Health has declared that they will soon conduct an early experiment on the US patients in the clinic to assess the effect of remdesivir to fight COVID-19. Remdesivir already showed no adverse conditions when an infected American confirmed, which is a published case study in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Comments are closed.